Bear in the big house coloring pages

Published at Sunday, 15 March 2020.

STENCILING. You may want designs on the walls, or perhaps even on floors and ceilings, in some of the rooms or hallway. You may buy or make your own stencils, which should be on heavy paper, stencil board, plastic, or metal. Avoid stencils made of lightweight paper which will get soaked when touched by wet paint. Your paint dealer will suggest the best paint for you to use, as it will depend a great deal on the surface over which you want to put the stenciled designs. Generally a heavy paint is used, so that it will not spread under the stencil while you are applying it. Materials and their application, every paint manufacturers paint will vary. If you are freshening up old walls and painting back to the existing color, the product doesn't have to be high end or have good coverage. If you need to paint a dark color over light color or light color over dark, you may want to consider purchasing a top quality paint to avoid multiple coats. I suggest Valspar, Pittsburgh or Benjamin Moore top of the line wall paint. These brands work well for straight out of the bucket use and are application friendly. Sherwin Williams is not my first choice because the coverage is poor and you will have to apply multiple coats but, it does apply, fluently. If you find a product does not apply well, maybe it is to heavy and/or sagging on the wall, you may need to thin the paint with a little water, this will reduce the coverage but make the paint flow better and lay down nicer on the surface. I do recommend latex paints for all applications, these days a good high end latex is as good as oil paint and your tools clean up much easier, it will also be less harsh on the respiratory system. The only situation I recommend oil paint, is as a primer/stain blocker over stains that "bleed" through the paint. You can get a stain blocking oil primer in a convenient spray can and spot prime any trouble areas before painting and in the case you need to prime all of the wall due to smoke or water damage, I recommend getting it in gallons and rolling it on where the stains are present. Don't forget proper ventilation and/or a respirator when using the oil based primers! New Paints Give You Pro's Skill. Painting your house will be easier than ever - if you get the right paint. But it's going to be harder than ever to pick it.

Even if you don't need to apply a coat of primer before your new coats of paint, doing so will always save you money. Whether you use white or tinted primer, a coat of primer is always more cost effective for one simple reason: It is cheaper! In fact, primer may cost as little as half as much as standard paint. If you get it tinted the same as your paint, then it is cheaper by the coat. If you use white, as in the first scenario above, it will also minimize the number of coats of paint you have to apply. Either way it reduces how much paint you have to buy. Do you want to learn more about maximizing your paint color coverage, minimizing your paint usage, optimizing coats, and perfecting your primer? If you are going to paint your home and have decided to do it yourself take a little extra time and spend a bit more money to do it right. Colors are subjective, but the quality of materials and painting tools are not. For this example we are going to go through the process of painting the interior of a typical home. In just about every paint job I did I insisted that customers used an oil based paint on woodwork and doors. Not only does oil paint make wood look and feel better it gives you a superior durable and washable finish that water based latex paint can't. There is nothing worse than seeing a newly painted door or frame ruined by fingerprints and other marks. Take your time there is no rush. There is nothing wrong with having your project take a couple of weeks. Always use a sanding block for flat surfaces. Just your hand behind a thin piece of sand paper can leave grooves and low spots. It's also easier on your hands. For inside curves try wrapping the sand paper around a short section of garden or heater hose. This will help approximate the concave curve and help stay away from sanding through hard edges. On hard edges, like the top ridge of a fender or leading edge of a hood, you need to do this by hand. A sanding block will quickly dig right through the paint on a hard edge and take you down to bare metal. This means primer and more sanding.